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This series will suggest some of the basic steps to follow, and things to be aware of, as you begin down the path toward home ownership.

 

Now that he outside walls have been built, it’s time to put the roof on the home. The process starts with roof trusses, which are manufactured framing members installed on the top of the wall plate, spaced at regular intervals, and are the framework to which the roof sheeting material is attached. Manufacturers use computers to design the trusses to not only support the weight of the roof sheeting and shingles, but also withstand the effects of weather such as wind, rain, and heavy snows. The trusses are usually set in place with a crane, and the framing carpenters attach each one to the walls, keeping them straight and the proper distance apart.  If the homeowner wants attic storage, the trusses can be designed and manufactured to create additional space between the home’s ceiling and the roof that is large enough to walk in and store personal items.

Crane Setting a Truss

Crane Setting a Truss

Attic Truss

Attic Truss

Once the trusses are set, the framers attach plywood or OSB to create the actual roof. Tar paper is then attached to the sheeting to create the first layer of waterproofing. In northern climates where ice damming may occur, an additional layer of Ice and Water Shield may be applied to prevent trapped water from leaking through the roof. Final roofing coverings are installed over the waterproofing. The most popular roofing material is the asphalt shingle, although metal and tile are often used on certain styles of buildings. The most important trait of roofing material is to shed water quickly, and to withstand damaging weather conditions including snow, ice, rain, driving winds, and intense heat from the sun.

Ice and Water Shield

Applying Ice and Water Shield

Sheeting the Roof

Sheeting the Roof

“The Main Point” – A roof has several functions. The most obvious is to protect the home from the elements. The other is to act as a stabilizing force that holds the house together. Once the roof is attached, the walls are kept straight and square, and are made strong enough to withstand high winds without buckling.